1. Dozens of special needs preschoolers view him as Mr. Garfield, but little do they know that after early mornings in the classroom, their favorite musically inclined mentor spends his evenings delivering music to the city of New York. Evan Garfield, along with his bandmates Michael Pedron, T.J. Masters, and Alan Busch of Conveyor are far from your usual mid-twenties New Yorkers. Juggling day jobs, thesis papers, and recovering from a week full of performances at CMJ Music Marathon, the guys of Conveyor exemplify that there is much more that exists behind the music. 

    Just a few hours before an evening show, Conveyor drummer Evan Garfield managed to steal away and find a few sweet minutes to hang with Grooveshark. Despite the hefty list of obligations that day, Garfield had every ounce of chipper still intact when we linked up. He admitted that though his life is riddled with the quintessential New York hustle and bustle, he is loving every minute of it. Primed and ready for a week of performances at CMJ, Garfield shared that despite currently residing in Brooklyn, he still feels like he and his bandmates are still from that college town in Florida. 

    Flacos Cuban Cafe, known for their ability to satisfy the deep-fried cravings of Gainesville’s bar hoppers, was the location that first united the quartet. Pedron and Garfield, along with fellow Gainesville musicians Michael Claytor and Devon Stuart, hosted a weekly music night at the restaurant that brought out the vocalists, instrumentalists, and music lovers from around town. This mecca for musicians introduced the future bandmates to one another and created the breeding ground for tons of other musical entities, including their long time friends Hundred Waters. Garfield shared that some of the highlights of his college experience was the sharing of music from different artists in the cramped back room of that Cuban cafe. Even though Wednesday nights at Flacos offered TJ, Alan, Michael and Evan the opportunity to play music around one another, it was not until leaving Gainesville did their musical journeys coalesce. 

    After moving to the Big Apple for graduate school, fate would have it that the rest of Evan’s mates would all emigrate to New York City as well. The years of making music around each other, paired with the fortuitous circumstances that brought them all to New York, made it impossible for the gentlemen to resist the opportunity to form a band. It all began when Evan and Michael volunteered to add their drum and bass on some demos created by TJ and Alan under the band name Conveyor.

    Evan admits that the choice to keep the name Conveyor came from a pure appreciation for the aesthetic of the word and the humor that came with donning a name that was much darker and grittier than their cuddly personas (as depicted in the above picture). Conveyor’s upbeat indie melodies mixed with their Four Top esque vocal harmonies perfectly reflect the youthful quirky energy of the band. 

    Though the city of New York has yet to set up a Flacos, Garfield shared that the Big Apple is starting to feel a lot more like that small college town. Aside from the new relationships the band is forming with other musicians, CMJ week allowed for Conveyor to reunite with their old Florida friends, Hundred Waters, on the same stage again. Garfield admits that he is grateful to be able to make music, but even more grateful to see the journey that he and his friends from Gainesville are experiencing together. 

    Conveyor on Twitter: @therealconveyor

    Conveyor on Facebook

    Catch Conveyor live in Boston this Saturday, November 3, at 7:00pm at Paradise Rock Club as they open for Geographer and Freelance Whales. Head back to the Grooveshark Blog every week to check out the latest news, exclusive updates, and interviews with amazing bands like Conveyor.


  2. A little over a year ago, Zach Tetreault spent his days in front of a computer managing some of the essential functions of Grooveshark. Flash-forward to the Fall of 2012, and this Grooveshark alumnus can be found emblazoned across the pages of Pitchfork with his band, Hundred Waters. Comprised of singer and pianist Nicole Miglis, multi-instrumentalist and programmers Paul Giese and Trayer Tryon, harmony vocalist and percussionist Sam Moss, and drummer Zach, this five-piece band’s music will soon be featured everywhere from Grooveshark to the soundtrack of one of the biggest video game franchises in history.

    In the heart of downtown, nestled near a record shop and across from Grooveshark HQ, the quintessential kitsch Gainesville hangout Maude’s Classic Café is the perfect place to catch up with the longtime friend of the Sharks, Zach Tetreault. Despite the exciting events unfolding in his career, which include his bands’ newly signed record deal,  the Hundred Waters’ drummer retained his perpetually calm demeanor.

    Unlike bands formed with aspirations for commercial success, Zach poetically admits that Hundred Waters is really just a haphazard byproduct of spending a summer doing the same thing the group had all done countless summers prior, making music that they felt proud of. Despite day jobs, the members would often reconvene at night to listen and discuss developing songs together. In order for everyone to stay up to speed with what was happening, the group utilized a folder in Dropbox to share all of their thoughts and progress. While there was no immediate intent to form a new musical entity, it was the first track on their debut album, Sonnet, that created what is now Hundred Waters.

    “…we finished that song and all just kind of realized that we had something here.”


    The song Sonnet embodies the depth of talent, hours of practice and performance, and years of friendship that serve as the foundation for this quintet. The guys in the band have been in numerous musical entities together since high school and prior to the creation of Hundred Waters, Trayer had already released two solo albums with the aid of Paul and Zach. However it wasn’t until they met concert pianist and lifelong solo artist, Nicole, did they find the last missing atom in the Hundred Waters’ molecule.

    “Last summer when the four of us were living under the same roof together for the first time, a lot of new musical ideas were being brought to the table. The ideas started evolving, began making a lot of sense, parts coming together, and Nicole’s vocals and lyricism just seemed to take everything to the next level, to the point where we were like, ‘Okay, it’s starting to feel like we’re making an album.”


    While many bands release their work in a series of singles, Hundred Waters chose introduce themselves to the world by leaking a free full debut album on their website. After circulating to friends, family, and the Gainesville community, the album caught the attention of different media sources and garnered the band stellar reviews in publishments such as Pitchfork.

    Positive coverage of Hundred Waters marked the beginning of the band’s exciting journey. Hundred Waters has now toured internationally, collaborated with acts such as Skrillex, Diplo, Grimes, Tokimonsta, Pretty Lights, and was recently signed to Skrillex’s OWSLA label. Zach admits that Grooveshark taught him a lot about the intricacies of the music business, but nothing could really prepare him and his bandmates for their experiences more than diving in head first.

    “Grooveshark stood behind Hundred Waters from the very beginning and helped us reach a ton of new people by promoting our music on an international scale. There’s a lot to be said about the power Grooveshark has in connecting artists with fans and I think it’ll continue to improve over time.”   


    The band hasn’t limited music creation to their Gainesville home. During their 12-day Full Flex Express Tour, the band collaborated on a brand new track with their aforementioned EDM tour mates. Zach shares that much like Sonnet, they utilized the power of cloud storage to allow each musician to add their artistry over the tune. Along with this track, Hundred Waters will feature a remixed song for the bonus compilation to one of the most popular video game series in history, Halo 4.

    “We wake up some days feeling as though we’re in a dream.  We’re just extremely grateful for the fact that we’re creating art alongside each other as a profession.”


    This fast-rising band is hydrating the music world by delivering their incomparable sound to thirsty listeners. Check out their latest release, Thistle EP and get a taste of their forthcoming self-titled album along with a series of remixes from the likes of Araabmuzik, Star Slinger, Tokimonsta, Lockah, and Different Sleep/Troublemaker.  

    Head over to Grooveshark.com and get the Hundred Waters site theme and stay tuned for the web premiere of their Grooveshark Session for Visitor.  Check back with the Grooveshark Blog every week to stay updated on our latest news and interviews with amazing bands like Hundred Waters.




  3. The Water Cooler 

          with The Eastern Sea


    Infectious energy, thoughtful lyrics, and a haunting melody, are just a few of the attributes that define the Austin based band, The Eastern Sea. These Texas natives took a break from the Florida leg of their tour to pop by the Grooveshark HQ to delight the Sharks with a refreshing dose of fun and undeniably great music.

    The Eastern Sea Grooveshark the Water Cooler

    Though we only managed to receive 5/8ths of the entire band, Matt (vocals/guitar), Kevin (trumpet), Chris (bass), Charley(drums) and Lauryn (keyboard/flute) refused to cut any corners when it came to delivering their music. Trumpets and flutes seemed to materialize throughout their set as the Eastern Sea managed to juggle nearly 8 instruments amongst the existing 5 members. The experience that each musician brought to the performance was evident from the way they seamlessly maintained the life and intent of each and every one of their songs.

    Though the maturity of their music is undeniable, the members that comprise The Eastern Sea don’t attempt to take themselves too seriously. While Charley and Matt took a break from the performance  by hanging out on the balcony with our artist team, Lauryn and Kevin chose to unwind by body slamming and belly flopping on the bean bags in the office. We all reconvened for dinner where the band teased us with a sample of their upcoming Christmas album, as well as offered up some insight on their recently released and highly praised  sophomore album, Plague.


    What’s songwriting process like?

    Matt:
    The way that i usually describe our song writing process,  especially with the Plague, its kind of like planting a seed and once you have a seed you cultivate the seed and I bring the seed (the basis of the song), and everyone else tends to the plant. Just like you tend to a plant  by manipulating the leaves and trimming the branches, thats what we all together. But every song kind of starts off, music and lyrics with our writer on keyboard or guitar.

    With the band gearing up to gearing up to become a more visible and public entity, what is something you want your audience to know about you guys.

    Matt:
    I think that it’s important for people to feel that we are honest above anything. Because if people feel like we are dishonest or disingenuous then our music is not worth anything.

    Charley:
    Like right now in Austin there is this big folk thing going around, and its hard to buy into because its not believable. Like a kid pulling up in a BMW dressed all raggedy with a straw hat playing old folk songs just doesn’t seem authentic.

    Lauryn: Its the evolution of the hipster. (chuckles)

    Does The Eastern Sea tend to surprise people with their music?

    Matt:
    Often. Especially because a lot of the time we play with bands that don’t sound like us. I think we have music that tends to shake people and its something they can identify with. When we were making the Plague, we wanted to make something that we could put in peoples hands and it would do the job for us. And I believe we accomplished it with this record.

    How’d you like hanging at the office today?
    Matt:
    It has been nice getting know the actual people behind a music streaming service like Grooveshark. Music streaming is such a huge part of today’s music listening as well as today’s music selling and funny to think that so many people use music streaming sites and never think that an entire team runs the functions of the website. Thats part of our generations web culture. But I have to say that hanging out with you guys and doing work with y’all has been exciting because I’m meeting really great people in a very specific side of my industry.

    So what are some things listeners can expect from The Eastern Sea in the near future? Rumor has it a Christmas album?

    Matt:
    We have a Christmas album coming out in early December on our WhiteLabBlackLab label and we are really excited about it. During July we spent some time in the studio putting together 12 songs, some that I had been playing for a while (I’ve been doing home recorded Holiday music every year for the last three years), and some that were brand new, even a few original compositions. I think Plague is a pretty serious endeavor for us and this Christmas album is a great balance of good vibes and silliness that we have been craving as a band, and I imagine our fans wouldn’t mind a break from all of the seriousness either.

    The Eastern Sea on Facebook

    The Eastern Sea on Twitter

    Hop onto Grooveshark and sample The Eastern Sea’s latest album, Plague. Check back with the Grooveshark blog every Tuesday to stay updated on our latest releases and our exclusive interviews with amazing bands like The Eastern Sea.